Category Archives: legends and myths

Robert Burns’s “Address to a Haggis” ~ January 25

January 25 – Robert Burns’s “Address to a Haggis” Burns suppers are held worldwide by Scots on January 25, and no Burns supper would be complete without a “Haggis.” Before you read any further, you should know that “Haggis” is … Continue reading

Posted in British history, food and drink, legends and myths, poetry | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Owain Glyndŵr, National Hero and The Last Native Welshman to Hold the Title “Prince of Wales”

Owain Glyndŵr (c. 1349 or 1359 to c. 1415) was the last native Welshman to hold the title Prince of Wales (Tywysog Cymru). He led an unsuccessful revolt against Henry IV of England. Glyndŵr’s family was part of the Anglo-Welsh … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, military, political stance, real life tales, Wales | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

James Figg, Father of Modern Day Boxing

Born into a poor farming family, James Figg is considered the father of Modern Day Boxing. The youngest of seven children, Figg grew up in Thames Village, Oxfordshire. He had achieved renown as a master of the short sword and … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, real life tales | Tagged , | 6 Comments

Jack Sheppard, Extraordinary Escape Artist, but Mediocre Thief

Jack Sheppard, Extraordinary Thief A favorite figure in verse, plays, and burlesque, John Sheppard was an 18th Century English thief. Born in Stepney on 4 March 1702, Sheppard spent several years (from the age of six) in the workhouse in … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, real life tales | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

John Ketch, Infamous Executioner

An infamous English executioner employed by King Charles II, John Ketch was an Irish immigrant who became famous through the way he performed his duties during the tumultuous 1680s. He was mentioned in the broadsheets of the time. Appointed in … Continue reading

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From Where Does That Phrase Come?

This first one is for Brian, who spoke of a preference for the word in one of my recent posts. Codswallop ~ Unknown, attested from 1959 episode of UK TV series Hancock’s Half Hour. The writers (Galton and Simpson) state that … Continue reading

Posted in British history, language choices, legends and myths, Uncategorized, word play | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Especially for Halloween: The Witchcraft Acts in Great Britain

Just for Halloween: the Witchcraft Acts in Great Britain In England, Ireland, Wales, and Scotland, there have been a series of acts to prevent the practice of witchcraft. The first of those was Henry VIII’s Witchcraft Act of 1542. It … Continue reading

Posted in gothic and paranormal, Great Britain, holidays, legends and myths, Living in the UK | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment