Category Archives: legends and myths

Sadie Hawkins’ Day, not a Leap Year Event + a Giveaway

(Image from Sadie Hawkins’ cards at http://www.postcards.org) When I was a teen girl, I enjoyed the school sponsored Sadie Hawkins’ dances. We didn’t exactly go for the girl asking the boy to the dance (like a date). But we did follow … Continue reading

Posted in America, American History, Appalachia, Austen Authors, customs and tradiitons, dancing, film, giveaway, history, holidays, legends and myths, marriage, marriage customs, Pop Culture, romance, tradtions | 16 Comments

Thomas Malory’s “Morte D’Arthur” Part II

Previously, I posted a detailed summary of Books 1 and 2 or Malory’s “Morte D’Arthur.” Today, I have chosen bits of the other books to discuss. Book XIII: This is the beginning of the Holy Grail legend. Arthur and his … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Chaucer, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxons, ballads, British history, Canterbury tales, Great Britain, legacy, legends and myths, medieval, reading, religion, romance, romantic verse, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Getting Ready for October: The Screaming Skull of Bettiscombe Manor

Bettiscombe is a small village and civil parish in west Dorset, England, situated in the Marshwood Vale 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Beaminster. Dorset County Council’s 2012 mid-year estimate of the population of the civil parish is 70. This … Continue reading

Posted in British history, buildings and structures, castles, customs and tradiitons, gothic and paranormal, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the Regency, Living in the UK, real life tales, Regency personalities | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Robert Burns’s “Address to a Haggis” ~ January 25

January 25 – Robert Burns’s “Address to a Haggis” Burns suppers are held worldwide by Scots on January 25, and no Burns supper would be complete without a “Haggis.” Before you read any further, you should know that “Haggis” is … Continue reading

Posted in British history, food and drink, legends and myths, poetry | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Owain Glyndŵr, National Hero and The Last Native Welshman to Hold the Title “Prince of Wales”

Owain Glyndŵr (c. 1349 or 1359 to c. 1415) was the last native Welshman to hold the title Prince of Wales (Tywysog Cymru). He led an unsuccessful revolt against Henry IV of England. Glyndŵr’s family was part of the Anglo-Welsh … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, military, political stance, real life tales, Wales | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

James Figg, Father of Modern Day Boxing

Born into a poor farming family, James Figg is considered the father of Modern Day Boxing. The youngest of seven children, Figg grew up in Thames Village, Oxfordshire. He had achieved renown as a master of the short sword and … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, real life tales | Tagged , | 6 Comments

Jack Sheppard, Extraordinary Escape Artist, but Mediocre Thief

Jack Sheppard, Extraordinary Thief A favorite figure in verse, plays, and burlesque, John Sheppard was an 18th Century English thief. Born in Stepney on 4 March 1702, Sheppard spent several years (from the age of six) in the workhouse in … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Georgian Era, Great Britain, legends and myths, Living in the UK, real life tales | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments