A Memory of the Marshall University Plane Crash

This is not a post on Jane Austen. Rather it is a a moment in time when I saw the true human spirit, and like Jane Austen, I need to speak of it. Today is the anniversary of one of the most tragic events I have ever experienced, and I hope you will allow me to take you into my life, and by doing so, you will understand more of what makes me the person I am and comprehend why I look to the simplicity of romance for my release. When I think back to the moments which have defined me as a person, I must choose my senior year in college. I attended Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia.

On November 14, 1970, the Marshall faithful followed the team to Eastern Carolina University for a closely contested game. Returning to Huntington after the loss, Flight 932, a chartered twin-engine Southern Airways DC-9, struck a tree on a hill 5,543 feet west of the runway. The plane cut a path 95 feet wide by 279 feet long through the tree line, even clipping an abandoned house. It crashed, nose-first, in a hollow 4,219 feet short of the runway. The plane, essentially, came apart. A fire melted most of the fuselage. All 75 people aboard, including the entire football team, coaches, a group of supporters, and a crew of five, died. Even today, the cause remains uncertain: weather (fog and rain) or too low of a descent or improper use of cockpit instrumentation data.

Besides being a MU student, I also spent some time with a volunteer fire unit, one of the closest to the accident. Upon my arrival at the scene, I was pressed into combing the hillside for the bodies, one of the most horrendous experiences of my life. With flashlights and flares used for light, we began to gather what we could salvage. Taking my finds to a temporary morgue at the National Guard Armory at the airport, I recall the terrible moment when we realized we had not enough body bags. On the hillside, small fires burned for hours, and only the jet’s engine and a wing section were recognizable. Pieces of bodies were scattered throughout the area. We covered our finds with white plastic to block the view of “interested” onlookers who rushed to the scene. What we could recover, we placed on sheets laid on the armory’s floor. I remember that, ironically, Logan Packing Company provided a cooling unit to preserve the bodies.

Over the next week and a half, I attended 13 funerals, three in one day alone. An “instant” snuffed out the lives of the young who still had potential before them (the players) and those who had greeted life as a partner (mothers, fathers, business leaders, doctors, lawyers, coaches). A 52-minute flight had changed a town and changed me. A grief impossible to explain gripped the area. It was not only that we lost a football program. In reality, we were not a powerhouse at the time, but we were one of the first schools to recruit Black athletes, a statement of change following the Civil Rights movement. And like every young person, I had my hopes on a brighter tomorrow. The crash was a gaping hole waiting to be healed.

Despite our common anguish, things happened to keep the hope alive. The NCAA allowed Marshall to play freshmen, something never permitted previously, and with the insistence of Nate Ruffin, a man who later served on the university’s Alumni Board, as did I, the program became whole again. Walk-on players stepped up, and a team resurfaced. I would like to tell you that the program miraculously became automatic winners, but that would be a lie. For my birthday weekend, the first game in 1971, I was among those in the stands at Morehead State University watching the “Young” Thundering Herd; and although MU lost, many of us saw it as a victory for the university and the town. The next weekend, I was again among the throng crowded into Fairfield Stadium for the team’s first home game. And miracle of miracles, God answered the combined prayer of a crazed crowd – from those who pleaded for a sign that He had not forsaken them. I am not one to beg God for winning lottery numbers or for an unexpected inheritance, but I admit to adding my silent prayers for a win and was granted a last-minute one over Xavier. For hours afterwards, we remained in the stands, hugging strangers who shared the joy of seeing hope resurrected.

Marshall won only one more game that season, and for over a decade the university and the town suffered through numerous losing seasons; yet, even with those losses, people remembered the Xavier win. Often one heard someone say, “Were you here when the plane crashed?” Meaning, “Do we have a shared identity?” In the mid-80′s, MU won a I-AA National Championship and in the 90s more games than any other Division I school. Like every other school, MU has its good seasons and its rebuilding ones, but football is not the lesson here.

What did I learn from this tragedy? First, life is short. Embrace each day as if it is your last. Secondly, hope never dies. Even when faced with complete devastation, some moment, no matter how brief, tells a person that the phoenix will rise from the ashes. Lastly, true love is the most compelling of tasks. It is what sees us through the darkness.

November 14, 1970, serves as a defining date in my life. Like many who experienced this tragedy first hand, I am forever changed. However, the release of the 2006 movie We Are Marshall filled that gaping hole. I cried the first time I saw the film – the memory still too raw even after 35 years, but with each subsequent viewing, the hurt has lessened. Instead of death, I now view the resiliency of the human spirit. That resiliency and that need for hope and love are the subject of my writing.

The Memorial Student Center Fountain was dedicated to the memory of the plane crash victims on November 12, 1972. Each year on the crash’s anniversary the water is turned off until the next spring. Its creator Harry Bertora said, “I hoped the fountain would ‘commemorate the living – rather than the dead – on the waters of life, rising, receding, surging, so to express upward growth, immortality, and eternality.’”

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16 Responses to A Memory of the Marshall University Plane Crash

  1. James Guida says:

    I was not a college student at MU on that fateful day, nor was I within 500 miles of the mountaintop. Yet, the evening of Sat, Nov 14, 2010, remains to this day, like 11/22/63 or 9/11/01 for me and for sooo many people who resided in the small town of Lyndhurst, N.J. The Plane Crash impacted me in ways that I never would imagine nor could till this day understand. I know it also affected thousands of people in a similar way. I posted a remembrance of that day on my Facebook this morning and received so many responses, e-mails and tel calls from people from Lyndhurst who experienced The Plane Crash; people I never thought would be so affected.
    I am today a N.J. State Superior Court Judge and Permanent Deacon of the Catholic Church. Please indulge me to share with you a recent Good Friday homily I preached:

    IN HILLSIDE CEMETERY, ON ORIENT WAY IN LYNDHURST, THERE IS A GRAVE OVERLOOKING GIANTS’ STADIUM MARKED WITH THE HEADSTONE “LIONEL THEODORE SHOEBRIDGE, JR.” A FEW YARDS SOUTH, IN THE JEWISH SECTION OF THE CEMETERY, YOU’LL FIND THE GRAVE OF “MARCELO H. LAJTERMAN.” AMONG THE MANY THINGS THAT MARCEL AND TEDDY HAD IN COMMON WAS THEIR DATE OF DEATH: NOVEMBER 14, 1970.
    WHY DO BAD THINGS HAPPEN TO GOOD PEOPLE? WHY DO INNOCENT CHILDREN HAVE TO SUFFER? WHY DO SOME PEOPLE DIE YOUNG? WHY DO ACCIDENTS HAPPEN? WHY DO HURRICANES, EARHTQUAKES, AND TSUNAMIS OCCUR, LEAVING DEATH & DESTRUCTION, DISEASE AND FAMINE IN THEIR WAKES? WHY?
    TRAGIC EVENTS OFTEN TRIGGER THE QUESTIONS: “IS THEIR REALLY A GOD?” AND IF SO, “WHY WOULD HE ALLOW SOMETHING LIKE THIS TO HAPPEN?” OUR FAITH IS TESTED, AND SHAKEN TO THE CORE. FOR SOME PEOPLE, IT’S JUST TOO MUCH: THEY’RE HURT; THEY’RE ANGRY; THEY TURN AWAY FROM GOD; AND LIVE OUT THEIR LIVES, CONSUMED WITH ANGER AND PAIN.
    A FEW YEARS AGO, THE MOVIE “WE ARE MARSHALL” PLAYED IN THEATERS. NOW, IT CAN BE VIEWED ON DVD. THE MOVIE TOLD THE TRUE STORY OF THE AFTERMATH OF A PLANE CRASH IN HUNTINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA, WHICH KILLED THE ENTIRE MARSHALL UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL TEAM, ITS COACHES, SUPPORTERS, AND THOSE PARENTS WHO WERE ON THE PLANE. THE STUDENTS AND RESIDENTS OF HUNTINGTON ALL ASKED WHY? WHY WOULD GOD LET THIS HAPPEN TO THEIR FRIENDS, TO THE UNIVERSITY, TO THEIR CITY?

    THE MOVIE PORTRAYS HOW THE CRASH AFFECTED THE UNIVERSITY AND THE COMMUNITY, AND HOW THE STUDENTS, THE TOWNSPEOPLE, AND OTHERS RESPONDED TO THE TRAGEDY. IT’S A STORY OF DEATH, OF HOPE, AND ULTIMATELY, OF RESURRECTION.
    WE ALL REMEMBER WHERE WE WERE ON THE MORNING OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001. THAT DAY AFFECTED ALL OF OUR LIVES AND TOUCHED THIS COMMUNITY IN MANY PAINFUL WAYS. FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS WERE TAKEN FROM US. THOSE WHO WERE IN THE WORLD TRADE CENTER THAT DAY AND SURVIVED MAY STILL EXPERIENCE NIGHTMARES FROM WHAT THEY WITNESSED. WE’VE ALL ASKED THE SAME QUESTION “WHY?” ABOUT THE EVENTS OF 9-11.
    I WAS A STUDENT ATHLETE, WELL, MORE STUDENT THAN ATHLETE, AT LYNDHURST HIGH SCHOOL IN 1970. WHOEVER LIVED IN LYNDHURST DURING THAT TIME WILL NEVER FORGET, BUT WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER, WHERE THEY WERE AND WHAT THEY WERE DOING ON THE NIGHT OF NOVEMBER 14, 1970.

    I REMEMBER IT AS IF IT WAS LAST NIGHT. IT WAS A SATURDAY EVENING AND MY PARENTS HAD GONE OUT TO DINNER. I WAS NOT HAPPY BECAUSE I HAD TO STAY HOME TO BABYSIT MY YOUNGER SISTERS. I WAS WATCHING TELEVISION, WHEN A NEWSFLASH CAME ACROSS THE SCREEN, AND THE ANNOUNCER SAID: “WE INTERRUPT THIS PROGRAM FOR A SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN. UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS THAT A SOUTHERN AIRWAYS JET, CARRYING THE MARSHALL UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL TEAM, CRASHED ON LANDING IN HUNTINGTON, WEST VIRGINIA. THERE ARE NO SURVIVORS. DETAILS AT 11.”
    I KNEW TEDDY AND MARCEL, TWO OF THE MARSHALL UNIVERSITY TEAM MEMBERS WHO PERISHED IN THE CRASH THAT EVENING. EVERYONE KNEW TEDDY AND MARCEL. THEY WERE THE KIND OF PERSONS YOU WANTED TO HAVE AS A BIG BROTHER. PRO FOOTBALL SCOUTS HAD PREDICTED BOTH WERE “CAN’T MISS,” FUTURE NFL STARS. AFTER MARCEL KICKED A 56 YARD FIELD GOAL, THE OPPOSING COACH, WHO TODAY IS A WELL-KNOWN SPORTSCASTER, TOLD MARCEL THAT HE WAS LOOKING FORWARD TO WATCHING HIM PLAY ON SUNDAY AFTERNOONS. AND IF YOU LOOK BACK INTO THE RECORD BOOKS THAT YEAR, AMONG THE TOP COLLEGE QUARTERBACKS, STATISTICALLY, WERE NAMED: THEISMANN, PLUNKETT, BRADSHAW, AND SHOEBRIDGE.
    SHORTLY BEFORE THE TELEVISION ANNOUNCEMENT, THE PRESIDENT OF MARSHALL UNIVERSITY TELEPHONED MSGR. BECK AT SACRED HEART, TO DELIVER THE TRAGIC NEWS TO TEDDY’S PARENTS. WITHIN MINUTES, THE TOWN WAS BUZZING, AND IT SEEMED AS THOUGH THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY DESCENDED UPON THE SHOEBRIDGE AND LAJTERMAN HOMES TO CONSOLE THEM AND TO SHARE THEIR GRIEF.

    AND YOU COULD HERE A PIN DROP IN CHURCH THE NEXT DAY, ALL EYES FIXED ON TEDDY’S BROTHERS, TOMMY AND TERRY, AS THEY WALKED IN, KNELT DOWN AND PRAYED DURING MASS. I’M SURE THEY WERE ASKING GOD “WHY?” AS WE ALL WERE IN THE SILENCE OF OUR HEARTS. WHAT PURPOSE DID IT SERVE TO TAKE THEM FROM THEIR FAMILIES AT SUCH A YOUNG AGE, WITH SO MUCH TO LIVE FOR?
    TEDDY’S BROTHERS, & MARCEL’S YOUNGER BROTHER, WERE TEAMMATES & CLASSMATES OF MINE. THERE WAS A PALL OVER THE SCHOOL AND THE TOWN FOR A VERY LONG TIME AS THE COMMUNITY GRIEVED OVER THE LOSS OF THEIR FAVORITE SONS. EVEN TODAY, THERE STILL ARE VISIBLE REMINDERS OF MARCEL & TEDDY AROUND TOWN, & THE MOVIE “WE ARE MARSHALL” BRINGS THEIR STORY TO A GENERATION WHO NEVER KNEW THEM.
    ALTHOUGH NOT WRITTEN ANYWHERE IN THE GOSPELS, I’M SURE THAT AS MARY KNELT AT THE FOOT OF THE CROSS, HELPLESSLY WATCHING, AS HER ONLY SON WAS DYING IN FRONT OF HER, SHE WAS ASKING GOD “WHY?” AFTER ALL, JESUS WAS THE INNOCENT OF ALL INNOCENTS, FREE FROM SIN AND GUILT. “WHAT PURPOSE DOES IT SERVE FOR MY SON TO SUFFER AND DIE THIS WAY, AT THIS TIME AND AT THIS PLACE?” SEE, NEITHER MARY NOR ANYONE ELSE UNDERSTOOD; NOT UNTIL EASTER MORNING.
    THE STORY OF MARSHALL UNIVERSITY DIDN’T END ON A FIERY HILLTOP IN WEST VIRGINIA. ITS FOOTBALL PROGRAM ROSE FROM THE ASHES TO BE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE PROGRAM IN THE 90s, WINNING TWO NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS. THE CITY IS THRIVING, AND THE UNIVERSITY IS TODAY ONE OF THE FINEST IN THE LAND.

    ONE OF MARCEL’S BROTHERS WENT ON TO PLAY PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL, AND ONE OF TEDDY’S BROTHERS PLAYED PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL. THEY ALL NOW LEAD SUCCESSFUL LIVES. TEDDY’S PARENTS AND MARCEL’S FATHER HAVE GONE HOME TO GOD AND ARE SURELY REUNITED WITH THEIR SONS. AND I KNOW THAT IF YOU ASK THE SURVIVING BROTHERS TODAY, THEY’LL TELL YOU THE MEMORY OF THAT NIGHT IS STILL FRESH, AND THE PAIN OF LOSS DOESN’T GO AWAY, IT JUST NUMBS OVER TIME. IT IS THEIR FAITH THAT GIVES THEM THE STRENGTH TO REMEMBER THEIR BROTHER WITH JOY AND LAUGHTER, GRATEFUL TO GOD FOR THE SHORT TIME THEY HAD TOGETHER.

    WE NEVER DO GET A DIRECT ANSWER TO THE QUESTION: “WHY?” THERE ARE TIMES WHEN NOTHING THAT WE SAY OR DO CAN CHANGE WHAT HAS HAPPENED. WE CANNOT RAISE A DEAD CHILD TO LIFE; THERE ARE NO WORDS WE CAN PRONOUNCE THAT WILL CURE CANCER OR LOWER TAXES. BUT IF WE CHANGE THE FOCUS FROM “WHY” TO “WHO”, WE MAY GET A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE ON THE TRAGEDIES THAT VISIT US. AND THAT “WHO” IS JESUS CHRIST. IT’S AT THESE TIMES THAT WE NEED TO MOVE CLOSER TO GOD; NOT AWAY FROM HIM. WHAT WE CAN DO IS MAKE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE REALTIES OF OUR LIVES AND THE REALITIES OF THE GOSPEL. IF WE REMEMBER THAT GOD, IN THE PERSON OF JESUS CHRIST, IS ONE OF US; THAT THE WORD WAS MADE FLESH, AND DWELT AMONG US.
    IF WE CAN IDENTIFY WITH JESUS AND RECOGNIZE THAT HE IDENTIFIED WITH US, WITH THE HUMAN REALITIES OF PAIN AND SUFFERING.
    HE MOURNED AT THE LOSS OF HIS FRIEND LAZARUS. HE SUFFERED FATIGUE, HOSTILITY, ABANDONMENT, AND EVEN TREACHERY FROM ONE OF HIS CLOSEST FRIENDS. HE ACCEPTED DEATH, DEATH ON A CROSS. IF WE REMEMBER THESE THINGS, THEN WE’LL BE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN OUR SUFFERING & HIS SUFFERING; BETWEEN HIS DEATH & OUR LIFE.
    BECAUSE WE ARE ALL PART OF THE “MYSTICAL BODY OF CHRIST,” WE CAN JOIN OUR SUFFERINGS TO JESUS’ PASSION AND DEATH. . JOHN PAUL THE GREAT WROTE IN HIS ENCYCLICAL SALVIFICI DOLOROS (THE MEANING OF HUMAN SUFFERING), THAT “CHRIST ANSWERS US FROM THE CROSS, FROM THE HEART OF HIS OWN SUFFERING. HE INVITES US TO FOLLOW HIM; TO TAKE UP HIS CROSS; TO LIFT UP OUR SUFFERINGS TO HIM. IN THIS WAY, WE UNITE OURSELVES TO CHRIST, NOT ON A HUMAN LEVEL, BUT AT THE LEVEL OF THE SUFFERING OF JESUS. AND AT THE SAME TIME, CHRIST DESCENDS TO OUR HUMAN LEVEL AND MEETS US THERE ON THE CROSS, WHERE WE ARE GRACED WITH INTERIOR PEACE, AND EVEN SPIRITUAL JOY.” Salvifici Doloros.
    THE GOSPEL READING TODAY CONCLUDED WITH THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF JESUS. BUT THE STORY DOESN’T END ON THE HILL WE CALL CALVARY. BECAUSE JESUS DIED ON THE CROSS, WE LIVE, AND BECAUSE HE ROSE ON EASTER SUNDAY, WE LIVE FOREVER. TODAY’S GOSPEL IS NOT ONLY A STORY OF DEATH; IT’S A STORY OF HOPE, AND ULTIMATELY, OF RESURRECTION.

    THE INSCRIPTION ON TEDDY SHOEBRIDGE’S HEADSTONE READS “WE WIN IN THE BIG THINGS.” ON THIS MOST SOLEMN DAY OF THE YEAR, WE HONOR OUR LORD & SAVIOR, WHO BY HIS DEATH ON THE CROSS, LEADS US TO THE BIGGEST VICTORY OF ALL, THE VICTORY OF LIFE OVER DEATH.

    Thank you for your post.

    • We in Huntington at that time next stopped to think what the lives of so many young people did to other communities. We were selfish in some ways because they were “our” children. We had adopted them when they came to play at Marshall. Thank you for a reminder of how this event affected so many others.

    • Johnny Russo says:

      Jimmy,
      I just read your post,today I woke up and just started to think of my best friend’s brother,Teddy who had passed,oddly enough some33years later living across the country from Lyndhurst,I wake up and was thinking of Terry,Tommy,and Teddy,the big brother who use to give us rides to school in his aqua colored convertible ,he was great guy,made me feel like he was my big brother.
      On this day I pray for Teddy and his wonderful family, and Lyndhurst a town I miss.
      Thanks for the whole story Jimmy,I got a lump in my throat.
      Johnny Russo

  2. tina napier poirier says:

    I was 9 when the Marshall plane crash happened. I was watching the Newly Wed Game when the crawl came across the bottom of the screen announcing a plane had crashed at tri-state airport. My Dad and Uncle left to go help, but couldn’t get close. As days followed and the tragedy began to consume us, I remember asking my Dad to take me as close as we could get. He took me up on 75 *

  3. tina napier poirier says:

    Sorry, didn’t finish. He took me up 75 hill, and o could still smell the jet fuel burning and burnt brush. I just stood there and cried. I for one, WILL NEVER FORGET.

    • It is something which sticks in one’s gut…an image that will not go away. When I visit my grandmother’s grave at Springhill, I go to the Marshall memorial there. It is very humbling.

  4. Pam Simpson Lewis says:

    I was 11 years old when the Marshall plane crashed. I was also in the second car that arrived at the scene. My father, brother and I were headed to Kenova to pick up my sister at a church youth function. My Dad pulled over headed up the hill; the plane crash to our right. He wouldn’t allow me, or my brother, to get out of the car. Upon exiting the car, my Dad leaned over and picked up something in the road. I later learned that it was Ted Shoebridge’s wallet. At that time, there were no fire trucks, ambulances, etc. at the site, and my brother and I were listening to the radio. The airport was reporting the crash, but at first they really had no idea who had crashed. I have so many memories of that night, and they are as clear now as they were 40 years ago. During the various activities for the movie, I was introduced to Tommy Shoebridge, who was shocked to find out the true story of his brother’s wallet; he told me that after the investigation was completed, the wallet was returned to his family and is now in his possession.

    • Pam, Thank you for sharing your story with me. It was a terrible, terrible night. I knew some of the players, and later, spent time with Reggie and Nate in other capacities. A woman who turned out to be one of my best friend’s ever is in the documentary because she lived so close to the airport. It is a collective grief we suffer, and with any type of grief, it is important to speak of it. That is part of the healing process.

  5. Rosemary Huff/formerly Rosemary Longo says:

    I lived in Lyndhurst, N.J. during 1956-1069. I went to Lincoln School and was in 7th grade, when I met Teddy Shoebridge, who was in 8th grade at the same school. I remember his kindness to the shy girl I was. I felt very saddened by his early death and I have seen the movie ‘We Are Marshall’ more than once. I plan to see ‘Ashes To Glory’ when I can locate it. Though I no longer live in Lyndhurst, I remember the closeness of that town and I mourn with them forever.

    • Rosemary, it was a tragedy in its strictest definition, but as the movie says, “from the ashes we rose.” Huntington will forever wear the mark of that night. I am sorry for your loss. I did not know Ted Shoebridge, personally, but those who did speak fondly of him.

  6. Julie Beader says:

    Regina, thank you for your post. I was watching the movie and, skeptic that I am, went online in search of facts. As is usually the case, critics were easy to find. Your post, however, captivated me, inspired me, moved me to tears and restored my optimism.
    Life is filled with tragedy – whether it’s a plane crash or your mother dying of cancer. But in any tragedy there is inevitably some beauty that rises from the ashes…eventually. Your writing and your story are beautiful. Thank you for sharing them with us.

    • Julie, there is a multitude of articles on the crash on The Herald Dispatch website. That is the Huntington, WV, newspaper, and it has an archived look at the tragedy. Thank you for your kind words regarding this event.

  7. MarshallPiKe93 says:

    I wasn’t on this earth at that time but my mother and grandmother were. I was born in 1973, they told me about the crash, the people they knew on board the plane. To honor them I wore #14 and #44 in football and baseball while playing sports like Ted did and I joined Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity just as Ted and 4 others had done. I’ve been to the monuments and the memorials, Ive been to the memorial services held by the University and the PiKes every year leaving with tears in my eyes. The pain felt that day has truly been felt for generations and will continue to be felt for more generations in the future. In the words of the Marines my message to Ted and the 74 others who lost their lives on November 14, 1970…..SEMPER FI!!! which means “Always faithful”

  8. Johnny Russo says:

    Pardon me,it has been 43 years Jimmy.
    God Bless Them All!

  9. Brian Loreti says:

    Just read this for the 1st time Judge. If i may: I grew up in Rutherford in the 60s and 70′s. My dad, Dr. Michael R .Loreti, was a general practitioner in Lyndhurst at the time and was the sideline physician for high school football team. Sometimes I could get on the sidelines. Ted Shoebridge was my first sports hero at any level. To me, he was larger than life. I will never forget the time when he had to briefly come out of the game for Dad to examine him. I asked if he was gonna be OK, and Ted patted me on the head and said “Don’t worry sport, I’ll be fine.” I remember telling this to the kids at school and they were so envious! I can still recall fetching the NY Times from our patio on the morning following the crash and cried once I realize my hero was gone! A very sad time indeed! I have the DVD of the movie have seen it numerous times, a great “rise from the ashes” feel to it. Rest in peace, Ted.

    • Thank you for sharing your story, Brian. I watched the movie last Saturday evening (after the Marshall loss to Rice in the Conference USA championship), and I cried throughout it. I was at the Xavier game and the Morehead State game and many more because the “healing” was slow in coming. By the way, I recently received this message from Craig Greenlee (a Marshall journalism grad):
      Craig Greenlee
      Hello Regina … I’m hoping you are the same person who wrote the blog entry from 2010 about the Marshall plane crash. I’ve written a memoir (November Ever After) and because of all the feedback I’ve gotten from readers, I’ll soon start work on a sequel. Would love to get your input for the sequel. The book’s blog site is http://NovemberEverAfter.com
      Thanks in advance for your consideration
      November Ever After
      novembereverafter.com
      A former player’s memoir about the 1970 Marshall plane crash and its aftermath.
      I thought you might be interested in the book and his next project regarding the tragedy. God bless you and yours…

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